Webinars

The Right Fit: Finding and Applying the Right CMF for the Job | Dec. 12, 2017

Tuesday, Dec 12, 2:00-3:30pm Eastern Time
Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1873042633351344130

Learn about New Jersey's current practice for using safety performance functions and crash modification factors. Sophia Azam and her colleagues at New Jersey DOT will discuss how they use these tools for HSIP project selections and enhancements, and how they handle situations when site conditions do not perfectly match the prediction models.

Do you ever feel like there's so much information on the Clearinghouse that you have trouble finding exactly what you need? Daniel Carter will discuss how to select a CMF and will demonstrate how to make use of the features of the CMF Clearinghouse to sort through hundreds of countermeasures and CMFs to find the most appropriate CMF for your situation.

 

Seeing the Value: Using CMFs to Calculate the Benefits of Safety Improvements | Dec. 6, 2016

View a recording of the webinar to the left. To download a copy of the webinar slides and answers to questions asked during the webinar, select the links below.

Presentation Slides: Solutions for Saving Lives on Texas Roadways (.pdf 1366kb)

Presentation Slides: Highway Safety Improvement Program Systemic Application (.pdf 721kb)

Presentation Slides: Why and How Your State Should Develop a State CMF List (.pdf 44kb)

 

Join transportation engineers, designers and planners from across the country to learn about the most recent updates to the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) CMF Clearinghouse, how two states are using CMFs to estimate the benefits of safety improvements, and how your state can develop a state CMF list.

 

Applying (or misapplying!) CMFs: The ins and outs of estimating crash reductions
Dec. 11, 2014

View a recording of the webinar to the left. To download a copy of the webinar slides and answers to questions asked during the webinar, select the links below.

Presentation Slides: Applying (or Misapplying!) CMFs: The ins and outs of estimating crash reductions overview (.pdf 320kb)

Presentation Slides: Practical limitations of CMFs (.pdf 790kb)

Presentation Slides: Sustainable safety at WSDOT (.pdf 1530kb)

Presentation Slides: WSDOT CMF short list (.pdf 1227kb)

Presentation questions and answers (.pdf 311kb)

 

Daniel Carter, researcher at the UNC Highway Safety Research Center and manager of the CMF Clearinghouse, began with a brief overview of new Clearinghouse features, focusing on how to select the CMF most appropriate to a specific scenario.

Frank Gross, highway safety engineer at Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc., shared common errors in applying CMFs and discussed how misapplication of CMFs can lead to overestimating or underestimating the potential benefits of a countermeasure.

Finally, John Milton and Jennene Ring from Washington State DOT shared how they developed a CMF "short list" for their state and presented an example of how they use CMFs to evaluate and prioritize projects.

 

Research meets practice: Identifying and applying CMFs | Dec. 16, 2013

View a recording of the webinar to the left. To download a copy of the webinar slides and answers to questions asked during the webinar, select the links below.

Presentation Slides: Identifying and applying CMFs overview (.pdf 180kb)

Presentation Slides: Estimating combined effect of multiple treatments (.pdf 671kb)

Presentation Slides: Using CMFs in roadside analysis (.pdf 1.04mb)

Presentation questions and answers (.pdf 296kb)

 

Daniel Carter, senior engineering research associate at the UNC Highway Safety Research Center and manager of the CMF Clearinghouse, begins with a tutorial on the recently updated search and filtering features of the Clearinghouse website. Following Daniel, several presenters will address the application of CMFs in various scenarios.

Often, it is possible to use more than one countermeasure at a given location. But then can you multiply the CMFs to estimate their combined effect? Not always! Dr. Frank Gross, P.E., Highway Safety Engineer with VHB, Inc., explains and demonstrates the engineering judgment that must be exercised when estimating combined effect of multiple countermeasures at a given location. In addition, Ashley Reinkemeyer, P.E., of the Missouri Department of Transportation, and Jeremy Fletcher, P.E., P.S.M., of the Florida Department of Transportation, show how they are applying CMFs to document design decisions and prioritize projects within their agencies.

 

Steering through the data: Understanding and using the CMF Clearinghouse
Dec 13, 2012

View a recording of the webinar to the left. To download a copy of the webinar slides and answers to questions asked during the webinar, select the links below.

Presentation Slides: Steering through the data overview (.pptx 480kb)

Presentation Slides: NCDOT example of CMF Clearinghouse use (.pptx 953kb)

Participant submitted questions and answers (.pdf 309kb)

As Crash Modification Factors (CMFs) become an increasingly important tool for engineers, designers and planners to estimate and compare the safety- and cost-effectiveness of countermeasures, the CMF Clearinghouse has become a vital resource.

Karen Scurry, transportation specialist at FHWA’s Office of Safety Programs, and Daniel Carter, senior engineering research associate at the UNC Highway Safety Research Center and manager of the CMF Clearinghouse, demonstrate how the CMF Clearinghouse helps highway safety professionals identify the most appropriate countermeasure and CMF for their safety needs. In addition, Shawn Troy, safety engineer at NCDOT, shares how North Carolina uses the Clearinghouse and how he selects CMFs to use throughout his state.

The information contained in the Crash Modification Factors (CMF) Clearinghouse is disseminated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the use of the information contained in the CMF Clearinghouse. The information contained in the CMF Clearinghouse does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation, nor is it a substitute for sound engineering judgment.